Stewed Purple Cabbage

The secret to this dish is lots of onion and very thinly sliced purple Cabbage. My Grandmother, who always made this without a food processor, cut the cabbage into superfine thin shreds and it was also so tender. To give it some extra flavor, she would add a few tablespoons of her chucksteak gravy towards the end.

Palacsintas

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This is the Hungarian version of crepes, although much easier to make, once you get the hang of it, and much more fun to eat. These very thin pancakes are traditionally served with a mixture of ground nuts, cinnamon and sugar, which are sprinkled generously on the palacsinta, after which you roll it up and eat it like a long jellyroll! For a more updated version, swap out the cinnamon, nut mixture for your favorite Jam. You’ll never forget the recipe, as its 1:1:1: egg, milk and flour. I always make at least double, since there never seem to be enough to go around!

Chicken Paprikash with Knokerly

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Does it get more Hungarian than Chicken Paprikash? This dish takes all of the most popular Hungarian vegetables, green peppers, onions, tomatoes and of course lots of paprika, and slow cooks them with chicken until they are very tender and melt in your mouth. You can serve this with rice, which you can cook with the chicken and vegetable, but if you want to be authentic, try making the Knokerly, which are delicious Hungarian dumpling noodles. They soak up the gravy and were always my favorite part of dish when I was young. If you want to taste Hungary on a plate, this is the dish for you!

Hungarian Cabbage and Noodles

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This is a simple Hungarian weeknight pasta meal. Instead of the traditional tomato based pastas that so many of us are used to, this pasta gets its flavor from the sweet carmelized onions and salty sautéed cabbage that get mixed in with the noodles. When I make this, I like to have almost equal ratio of cabbage/onions to noodles. The cabbage and onions are the best part!
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Once a week, when I was in High school, we would eat dinner at my grandparents house and this was a standard. My grandmother came from a world where to feed people was to serve them meat and potatoes. This dish has always been a favorite of m Uncle Tom’s and has now become a frequently requested dinner by my husband. You can cook this in the traditional method using a pot on the stove for a few hours, or use a pressure cooker to pull this dish together in less than 30 minutes.
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Rakkot Krumpli is Hungarian comfort food at its best. My husband jokes that Hungarian foods use the same few ingredients over and over in different ways, and this one is no exception. It brings together many of the Hungarian classics: sour cream, paprika, potatoes and eggs - all which come together in this creamy and delicious one dish meal. My mother used to make this for us as kids and now my children love eating this slightly modernized (sorry Mom) version of the original dish.