Yemenite Chicken Soup

This is a warm and comforting chicken soup, with a delicious Mediterranean twist. The addition of cilantro, dill and parsley as well as the Hawayij spice mix with cardamom, coriander, and turmeric turn this chicken soup into a Yemenite feast. If you like spice, try adding a teaspoon the homemade Zhug to your bowl before taking your first bite - or eat this with a side pita and zhug.
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This is a mix between a potato salad and mashed potatoes. The potatoes get mixed with a balsamic vinaigrette that kicks this up another notch.

Beef Borscht

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Borscht comes in lots of different varieties. The common denominator is the beets that form the base with its dark purple color. This borscht is a hearty beef soup that in addition to beets uses, leeks, celery cabbage, potatoes and flanken, which all come together in a melt in your mouth rich soup with tons of flavor. I love to add marrow bones or beef bones for extra depth. This is a great one pot meal when you are craving a bowl of hearty soup for dinner. (Adapted from Jewish Soul Food)

Split Pea Soup

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I love split pea soup on a cold winter night and this one can be made in no time using a pressure cooker. The split peas after cooking for 30 minutes in a pressure cooker or 2-3 hours in a Dutch Oven, will melt down and form a thick broth. My husband loves having a few hot dog rounds floating in his, so if you are up for a non-vegetarian option, try it!
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Once a week, when I was in High school, we would eat dinner at my grandparents house and this was a standard. My grandmother came from a world where to feed people was to serve them meat and potatoes. This dish has always been a favorite of m Uncle Tom’s and has now become a frequently requested dinner by my husband. You can cook this in the traditional method using a pot on the stove for a few hours, or use a pressure cooker to pull this dish together in less than 30 minutes.

Whole Roasted Lemon Chicken

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Sometimes on a wintery Hanukah night, as the candles burn inside it’s nice to sit around the table with family and friends and eat a simple and homey roasted chicken. This whole roasted chicken, with some extra bright flavor from lemons squeezed over the top, will hit the spot this Hanukah. I cook the chicken along with onions, carrots and potatoes, in one large roasting dish, so that all you have to do is carve it up and your whole meal is ready! (Inspired by Julia Child’s Roast Lemon Chicken)

Chicken with Potatoes and Onions

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This is one of those meals that just smells like home. Not only is it a really comforting meal, but it is an easy to make, one dish meal. You layer the potatoes and onions on the bottom of the dish and top them with the chicken. As they cook together, the onions caramelize into sweet goodness, while the potatoes get creamy and flavored by the chicken and spices. Serve this chicken with a simple green salad or my roasted string beans or carrots.

Cous Cous with Fall Veggies

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Cous Cous is a staple in the Israeli kitchen and has become one in mine. You don’t have to cook this grain, just add hot water and let it sit. Once I found whole wheat cous cous, in my local store, I started using this as the base of various dishes. This one uses a mix of fall veggies, like butternut squash and cabbage and protein rich chickpeas, alongside a flavorful broth with saffron and turmeric. This is a great meatless main that is flavorful and filling. (Adapted from Janna Gur’s Jewish Soul Food)

Roast Chicken with Lemon and Herbs

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Roast chicken is a classic, but this recipe, has all of those delicious “extras” that will transform this weeknight roast chicken into a feast. Years ago, I watched a video on Martha Stewart, ("Eden's Roast Chicken") featuring this recipe and I knew I would love it when I saw the roasted lemons, capers and olives. If your go-to section of whole foods is the olive and pickle bar, you will love one-tray roasted chicken with its lemony-salty flair.

Veggie Curry

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Curries are great ways to enjoy whatever leftover veggies you may have laying around the house. This curry features warm spices, along with coconut milk, for a delicious and comforting early fall meal. I use potatoes, eggplant and string beans, but you can be creative and substitute other vegetables instead.